Baldwyn’s Threat

From my voluntarie Confession and Examination  (April 2, 1612)

“Richard Baldwyn sayd get out of my ground Whores and Witches, I will burne the one of you, and hang the other.

To whom [I] answered: I care not for thee, hang thy selfe.

Presently whereupon . . . going ouer the next hedge, the said Spirit or Diuell called Tibb appeared . . .and [I] sayd, Revenge thee of him.

[I] sayd againe to the said spirit Revenge thee eyther of him, or his.

And so the said Spirit vanished . . . and [I] neuer saw him since.”

Hanging

Source: Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster, 1613.

My Devil Tibb: Part Two

Tibb

I only saw Tibb a few sundry times over the next five or six years.  He always came at the Daylight Gate and asked what I bid.

“Naught,” said I, for I wanted nothing from him yet.

Then one Sabbeth morn he appeared in the likeness of a brown dog, jumped straight in my lap, and suckled from a spot beneath my left arm.  It hurt like the devil and I cried out, “Jesus! Save us all!”

Then I fell into a madness, or so they tell me.

All I recall is wandering in purgatory for nigh-on eight weeks, while the spirits of darkness whispered their secrets and my true self came to the fore.

I awoke no longer as Elizabeth Southerns.  I’d become the wise  Old Demdike.

 

My Devil Tibb: Part One

Portrait_of_a_boy[1]

I first met Tibb nigh-on twenty years ago, near Gouldshey stone-pit.  He came to me in the shape of a lad, dressed up all fancy in a black and brown coat.  I thought he was some young master who’d got himself lost ’til he beckoned me over and demanded, “Give me thy soul!”

“Why would I do that?” I asked him, staring at the face of a fallen angel.

“If ye do, thou can have all thy wants,” says he.

I thought on his words and requested he utter his name.

“Tibb,” he told me – and I knew then it was a spirit or devil stood afore me.

I pondered the offer.  Such a promise was mighty tempting indeed – and so I verily agreed.